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Your Questions

There are bound to be lots of questions you need to ask about our service, but the questions below hopefully will answer most of your queries.  Simply click on the questions below to take you to the answers further down the page.

Who does the case manager work for?
How is the case management service paid for?
How is the case manager appointed?
What happens if my case manager is away?
What happens if I don't get on with my case manager?
How often will I see my case manager?
How long does the case management process go on for?
Can the case manager also provide expert evidence within the same claim?
Who does the case manager work for?

The case manager works for the client, who is the person with the injury.  In the case of a child, the case manager works in conjunction with the parents, but remains the child's advocate.

How is the case management service paid for?

Funds for case management are usually funded by a personal injury compensation claim.  If the case has not been settled, an interim payment may have been obtained and will probably be held by the solicitor, acting on behalf of the client.  Sometimes the insurers will pay the case manager directly on receipt of their invoice.  These payments will have been previously agreed and are made for services such as case management, rehabilitation, care and support and specialist equipment.  if the case has settled the money may be held by a Receiver and the Receiver will arrange payment of the case management invoice.

Invoices are sent to the person who is holding the money.

The case management assessment report provides annual estimated costs.  Case management will not commence until we have received confirmation that money is available for the predicted costs and the fee payer has signed our terms of business.

How is the case manager appointed?

Sam Harris considers which one of the HACM case managers is suitable and whether they will be able to take on the case.  HACM have a number of case managers experienced in a variety of specialisms.  Sometimes case managers will co-work so that the client receives the best possible service, for example we have a case manager specialising in training and recruitment.

What happens if my case manager is away?

Another case manager will be assigned to you during your case manager's absence.  We aim for this to be the case manager who has been co-working because they will know you and be familiar with your case.

What happens if I do not get on with my case manager?

You should contact Sam Harris at our head office.  You may wish the case to be transferred to another case manager and that is your decision.  If we have another case manager whom you would be happy to work with, the case would be transferred to them.  Alternatively, we will advise you of other organisations who may be able to provide case management services in your area and we will cooperate fully with them.

How often will I see my case manager?

Input is almost always highest during the first one to two year period, when the service is being set up and getting established.  During this period some clients require weekly visits for several months, whilst others will commence with visits every two to three weeks and then reduce to monthly with regular telephone / email contact in-between visits.

The case management proposal, which is prepared after an initial assessment, will give an estimation of anticipated levels of input in each particular case, based on the case manager's assessment of individual need.

How long does the case management process go on for?

Case management depends on the individual needs of the client and may continue over the lifetime of a client or it may be only over the short term to solve specific problems.  When support workers are involved with the client, we advise that there is a case manager to deal with matters of employment and to monitor the care provided.

The level of involvement by the case manager is dependent on the requirements and wishes of the Receiver and client.  The most dependent and clients with complex needs will benefit from case management for life, and this may have been considered in scheduling the compensation award, although the level of intervention will rise and fall throughout different stages in the client's life.

Some client will require intensive case management involvement for around two to three years and then at times of major life changes.  Other clients will no longer require case management when services and support are well established, or they have reached a stage of independence when they no longer require support.

Can the case manager also provide expert evidence within the same claim?

Case management is independent and outside of the litigation process.  However, case managers are experienced and many also provide expert evidence in cases for which they do not provide clinical case management.  It is not appropriate for the case manager who is providing clinical services to also be the expert in the case because it has the potential to lead to a conflict of interest.

HACM provide monthly progress reports and reassessment reports and these may form part of the factual evidence in the litigation case.  The case manager may also be called upon to be a Witness of Fact in the claim, to provide information about the everyday difficulties the client faces and how they cope with these, which includes describing support.  To support evidence of the clients needs the narrative dairies form part of factual evidence.

 

Case Management question book

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